Why Dairy Farming Is Important

I realize seeing as this was really the main point of starting this blog, I probably should’ve had this been my first blog post, but I didn’t think of it at the time. Lately I’ve seen all the problems the dairy industry has been having due to just poor circumstances and the times we’re living in. But this doesn’t mean that the dairy industry will die out. It just means that we will deal with hardships, and we will come back stronger. But all the negative media we get doesn’t help at all. I just read a story yesterday about someone who wasn’t a part of the industry not quite understanding what a farmer was trying to do, and the farmer lost three cows because of it. I’ve also heard of many accounts from people who just really don’t understand that not just dairy farms, but every single farm in the world help to bring food and sustain the world who’s population is now almost exceeding 7,000, 000. So here’s just a few reasons why dairy farming is important, and why if it did fade away we would all have a very big problem.

1. No Farmers No Food

I’m sure you’ve all heard the saying at least once in your life, “No Farmers, No Food”. Well I’m here to tell you that this is more true than most anything else when it comes to farming. Pretty much anything a person eats has come from some type of farm. Farming isn’t just the animals, though obviously that’s where the milk and meat comes from, but even dairy farmers plant crops that sustain others that don’t eat those things. Also there are so many things in the world that have milk in them, or are made from milk, or are related to milk that a lot of people don’t realize.

2. Responsibility

Growing up on a farm helps many kids all around the world to learn how to be responsible for something besides themselves from an early age. Since I’ve started on my family dairy farm I’ve had many people come up to me over the years and tell me I am very mature for my age, and I know for a fact that if I hadn’t started taking care of my own cows I would never ever have heard that. Over the years my cows have become more than cows, they are basically family, and if I had never started with them I would be a much different person, and I have no idea where I’d be today.

3. Public Interest

Even with all the negative media surrounding the dairy industry, it’s one of the best parts of the county fair that I go to every summer when someone who doesn’t know much about cows comes up and starts asking about them, because they genuinely want to know more. There are those out there that are still and always will be interested in dairy cows and how the farm works, even though they don’t do anything with farming themselves, and sometimes that is refreshing.

4. Jobs

Not just dairy farming, but all of the farms in the US employ a good percentage of people. I’m not sure of the exact number so I’m not going to say an exact percentage, but I do know that at least where I live if farms went away most of the community would be stuck with no job and without an ability to get another because they’ve been farming all their lives and they don’t know how to do anything else.

5. A Common Cause

When farming is a normal and most common thing in a community it gives people a common cause to help and protect it. Just a few years ago when I was in high school and a part of the FFA, the FFA leader left and then the school almost got rid of it along with all of the agriculture classes offered. But the community got together and stopped it in every way that they could, and we got a different FFA leader. With the community mostly farms it just didn’t make sense not to have agriculture classes in the school, which is what most of the community thought.

6. ** We Take Care of Our Cows **

I starred this one because it is the most important point I have, especially with all of the negative media saying the opposite. Dairy farming gets a bad reputation from those few factory or industrial large farms that get the videos of them on the internet of them mistreating their cows. But those are few and far between. More often than the factory farms are the family farms, which love their cows more than themselves, and will do everything in their power to give them as much of a happy and comfortable life that they can and to help them when they’re hurt or sick. Just a few months ago one of the family farms I know caught on fire. As soon as the farmers realized they were running into the flames to save the cows, and one even punched a fire fighter when he tried to tell her she couldn’t go back in there. There was also a chance of them getting hurt or electrocuted, (they think it possibly got struck by lightning), which is why they couldn’t go back in. But it was a small fire and they got it out, only losing a few in the process. The farm is back up and running now, and the rest of their cows are fine.

This is just one of the many stories I could tell of farmers doing everything they could for their cows, not thinking about themselves at all. There are also many other points I could make about why dairy farming is important and will never be gone, (at least not while I have anything to say about it), but I will leave these six points here for now. I might add more later in a different post, but who knows. And this is one of the most important messages I want to portray with this blog, and a message I think the world needs right now. No one will ever be able to convince me otherwise about any of these points because I believe in them full-heartedly, and I believe that when you believe in something you fight for it. I am also a feminist, along with a believer in rights for the LGBTQ community (not quite sure what to call that), so there are many things I believe in, but I believe in the dairy industry most of all. And I know when you believe in something, you fight for it no matter what.

“I, for one, am actually still incredibly idealistic, and I still can credibly or very strongly believe that you have to keep fighting for what you believe in, because it’s only when you stop that you’ve truly lost.” Vanessa Kerry

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